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SCOTLAND'S REGIONAL MOORLAND GROUPS
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Angus Glens Moorland Group
Grampian Moorland Group
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Southern Uplands Moorland Group
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ABOUT US

Scotland’s Regional Moorland Groups are a collection of sporting estates from across six

regions of Scotland. From a range of rural working communities from the shores of Loch Ness in the Highlands, through the grey mountain ranges of the Monadhliaths, down through picturesque Royal Deeside, over the rolling hills of the Angus Glens, to the traditional sights of Tayside & Central Scotland down to the lower regions of the Southern Uplands!

These groups represent the true grass roots. The boots on the ground whose job it is to look after and conserve the moorland habitat that you see around our iconic uplands. Here, they

manage a variety of species, from deer to rabbits and foxes to crows, helping to preserve the environment and the industry that keeps them, our rural workers, employed, their families housed and brings in much needed income to local shops and businesses across their surrounding areas.

Burning Hills, Brave Hearts: How Rural Workers Helped Tackle the Cannich Wildfire! 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿
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Scotland's Regional Moorland Groups

Burning Hills, Brave Hearts: How Rural Workers Helped Tackle the Cannich Wildfire! 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

The crucial role that gamekeepers, stalkers and rural workers played in tackling the huge wildfire at Cannich is being explained in our new film below! Yesterday gamekeepers spoke to Kate Forbes MSP, of the role they played alongside the Scottish Fire & Rescue Service, providing expert knowledge as well as estates supplying vital equipment such as argocats, fogging units and leaf blowers to tackle and contain the wildfire. ‘First and foremost, I would like to thank all of the firefighters, gamekeepers, rural workers and communities who played an active part in tackling the recent wildfires in Cannich and Daviot. ‘I held a wildfire summit recently, which was a positive first step in learning the lessons of the recent fires and adapting the approach to future fires. I’m grateful to everybody who contributed to the constructive discussion. ‘The clear and consistent message is that wildfires are likely to become more intense and more frequent, as is seen across parts of Europe, unless decisive action is taken. ‘ As such we must ensure that we use as many techniques as possible at our disposal for combating fire, including helicopters dropping water but also man-made breaks in vegetation, usually created through backburning.’ - Kate Forbes MSP. Film produced by Kirk Norbury Filmmaker & Photographer on behalf of Scotland’s Regional Moorland Groups.

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