In Search of Science
09:58
Pace Productions

In Search of Science

This films looks at research being undertaken by the German Game Conservancy, during a project in Scotland, to better understand how our use of the land affects wildlife. Film produced by www.paceproductionsuk.com A new film charting the exceptional array of species found by international scientists on an Angus Glens estate has been launched. In Search of Science, produced by Pace Productions in conjunction with the Angus Glens Moorland Group, follows visits to Glenogil Estate by German conservationist Dr Daniel Hoffman and his team from Game Conservancy Deutschland. In total, 98 different bird species were found at Glenogil, and the estate has been lauded for its land management which has led to it becoming a haven for biodiversity largely unseen in mainland Europe. Daniel Hoffman said: “This is the third year that we have worked here at Glenogil and so far we've found 98 different bird species in this whole area. We wanted to show other estates, other countries in Britain and in the whole of Europe, that you can have this biodiversity only when you have the ecologically correct form of management in an area. “When I was here for the first time it was amazing to see the biodiversity. We read papers and articles saying that species such as the curlew, a flagship species in nature conservation, are endangered in Britain but you can't believe that when you are here. We find golden plovers with a high population density, and even on these few hectares here on Glenogil, we find almost double the number of breeding pairs that you find in whole Germany. They breed here because the landscape is managed as it is. “At Glenogil you have habitat management and predation control so the survival rate of our target species is so good. This create a kind of donator population and other areas they will have benefit from the work that is done here. If you have an area and say, "Oh, okay, we do nothing here," then you will lose biodiversity, and that's what we want to show. We want to show that you have to do habitat management and predation control to have a high level of biodiversity from different species, all different species.”
Game For Giving 2020
02:52
Scotland's Regional Moorland Groups

Game For Giving 2020

FESTIVE FOOD FOR THE NEEDY DONATED BY MOORLAND GROUPS Gamekeepers from Speyside Moorland Group and Tomatin Moorland Group are distributing 180 ready meals and fresh produce to the homeless and local families who have found times hard this year, in and around the Tain region and surrounding areas stretching as far as Inverness. The moorland groups have joined forces with Simpson’s Game and Platform 1864 restaurant in Tain to create fresh and frozen casseroles, made with pheasant and partridge from estates in the Tomatin and Speyside Moorland Groups. The donation is part of the award-winning Game For Giving initiative, which was originally set up in 2016 and has fed over 2,500 families in Scotland to date. The moorland groups are also donating 50 packs of pheasant and partridge breasts to the Christmas Hamper Appeal organised by Graham Rooney, owner of Platform 1864. “The gamekeepers, shepherds, estate staff and their families in the moorland groups have been collaborating with local charities for some time,” said Lianne MacLennan, National Co-ordinator of Scotland’s Regional Moorland Groups. “It is not solely a Christmas initiative but there are particular requirements at this time of the year and the members have been delighted to get involved to help. “It is great to see good quality local game being tasted by more people as it is a healthy free-range product that not enough people get the chance to enjoy. “Working like this helps everyone. Our group members are pleased to see the game being appreciated by people and to support vital homeless, family and community causes at this time of year. Simpson’s Game and Graham Rooney and his team at Platform 1864 have done an amazing job preparing these delicious ready meals for the north leg of the project. “Graham also runs his own Christmas Hamper appeal, which we also donate to and the fact that he can help us shows not only what Christmas spirit is about but how small rural communities really can come together and support each other. Especially after this incredibly difficult year.” The recipients are local vulnerable people, families and the homeless as well as residents in care homes. In other parts of Scotland Game for Giving has organised community lunches using fresh, sustainable game direct from estates with the help of local game dealers and butchers. The Angus Glens Moorland Group has donated to a community centre in Dundee this year feeding 80 people so far this year. Tayside and Central Scotland Moorland Group has donated to a local charity in Perth, feeding 250 people so far.
SAVING ROWAN - Walkers & Gamekeeper Rescue Barn Owl
01:45
Scotland's Regional Moorland Groups

SAVING ROWAN - Walkers & Gamekeeper Rescue Barn Owl

ALKERS AND GAMEKEEPER SAVE RARE OWL FROM STICKY END A rare barn owl has been saved from an untimely sticky end with the help of concerned Angus walkers and a local gamekeeper. Lauren Moir, daughter Layla and partner Dale Dunbar were enjoying a stroll in the Angus Glens when they came upon an owl flapping in thick mud in a water course. Hot summer weather had caused the water to dry up, leaving a circle of thick, deep mud which had entrapped the curious owl as it had hunted for prey. Eager to assist the distressed owl, Lauren tried to pile up stones in the mud to get closer to the owl before Dale finally managed to free it from its sticky berth with a branch. With its feathers caked and matted, the walkers gathered up the stunned bird safely in Lauren’s hooded top, drove to her mother’s house and sought the advice of a gamekeeper on the local estate. Calls were made to a friendly falconer and gamekeeper Garry MacLennan collected the owl, which the finders had named ‘Rowan’, and took it home for a clean up. Taking on board the falconer’s recommendations, Rowan was bathed gently in a kitchen sink and dried off, freeing the mud which had made movement difficult for the bird. Rowan was then kept warm overnight in a box, fed with a rabbit leg, and was checked in the morning. Satisfied that the owl had regained its full strength and movement, gamekeeper Garry called on the group who freed Rowan from the ooze. Watching on was young Layla, her friend Pyper and Garry’s son Mason, who assisted in the care, Rowan was let out of the box close to where it was found and flew happily towards trees at a field edge, where owls often nest. Barn owls are Schedule One birds and are fully protected all year round. There are only 4000 pairs in the UK. Without timely assistance, it is likely Rowan would have starved to death. Lauren said: “When we first spied the owl, we knew we had to get it out. I started to pile stones to get closer but the mud was quite deep. I piled about 4 or 5 stones on top of each other so we could get as close to the bird as possible. Dale managed to hook the owl out of the mud with a stick from the woods. The whole thing took about 45 minutes.” She added: “It was great to see Rowan get released and we are happy to know we probably saved its life. It was a really positive experience for my daughter Layla and her friend Pyper to see it flying away again.” Gamekeeper Garry MacLennan, who bathed and fed the owl said: “We have 4 breeding pairs of Barn Owls on the estate. They are majestic birds and I love to watch them hunting at night. I was happy to help Rowan recover from otherwise a horrible death.”